Interesting Facts about the Hebrew Program that you might not know of

Did you know that when you learn Modern Hebrew

  • you can read ancient texts written in their original language.
  • you can listen to hit TV shows and Israeli movies, appreciating the undertones and special humor.
  • your curriculum will include meeting celebrities, discussing their works over lunches, participating in an Israeli film festival and making valuable personal connections.
  • you will earn a full three credits for the year.
  • you can choose whether you use the Humanities or Social Sciences general education designations.

If those facts sound interesting, please consider joining Hebrew courses. Please email the professor Dalit Katz at dkatz01@wesleyan.edu for more information.

HIST 304: Middle East Intellectuals and Modernity

HIST 304: Middle East Intellectuals and Modernity
Toksoz,Meltem
Thursdays, 01:20PM-04:10PM
Allbritton 004

How have Middle Eastern intellectuals conceived and discussed modernity? We will use this question to analyze the variety in the history of thought in Middle Eastern societies in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Modernization, formation of the modern state and issues of nationalism, imperialism and colonialism, main intellectual questions of the time, will form the framework as we analyze their political, social, and cultural impact on the production of knowledge in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman lands. As such it is NOT a history of the Middle East but rather a history of mentalities, organized around four thematic/chronological modules (Reform, Modern State and Constitutionalism/Panislamism, Nationalisms and Colonialisms) each representing a set of concepts, ideas, and movements as well as facts and problems, all of which will be compared to the larger world of modern state formation both in thought and practice. The principal aim is to familiarize students with the processes of modernization in the making of the modern Middle East.

Winter Session Aid Application Available in Portal

Winter Session aid application is available in the Courses/Winter Session bucket of your Portal. It will be open through noon, Wed, Nov 3. If you are thinking about a Winter Session course, please apply for aid now. Applying for aid does not obligate you to take a class.

Interesting facts about the Hebrew Program that you might not know of

Did you know that when you learn Modern Hebrew

  • you can read ancient texts written in their original language.
  • you can listen to hit TV shows and Israeli movies, appreciating the undertones and special humor.
  • your curriculum will include meeting celebrities, discussing their works over lunches, participating in an Israeli film festival and making valuable personal connections.
  • you will earn a full three credits for the year.
  • you can choose whether you use the Humanities or Social Sciences general education designations.

If those facts sound interesting, please consider joining Hebrew courses in the spring semester. There are available spots in the Intermediate and Advanced levels. Please email the instructor Dalit Katz at dkatz01@wesleyan.edu for more information. I hope to see you soon in one of my classes.

Learn More about the FGSS Fall 2021 Gateway Courses

Learn more about these FGSS Fall 2021 gateway courses that are available to first-year and sophomore class students:

Course Description
Feminist, gender and sexuality studies is an exciting interdisciplinary field that addresses gender, sex, and sexuality as well as related issues of race, class, nation, and citizenship across multiple disciplines, epistemologies, methods, and vantage points. At its most fundamental, the field addresses how persons are identified and identify themselves as similar to and different from each other and the relation of these categories of difference to power relations. The study of feminist and queer thought on sex/gender and sexuality offers a critical lens through which to examine social structures and social problems, inequality, difference and diversity, identity and the self, belonging and community, and the possibility of social change, among other topics. This course will offer a broad introduction to the field and provide a foundation for further study of specific areas of interest. The primary goals are to (1) explore the multiple ways feminist and queer scholars have understood sex, gender, and sexuality; (2) explore different methods and styles of feminist thought and expression; (3) situate these in time and place, with attention to historical and cultural contexts; and (4) explore the intersections of sex, gender, and sexuality with race, nation, and other categories of difference. The course will cover aspects of first-wave feminism (e.g., suffrage and the abolitionist movement); second-wave feminism and critical theories of sex/gender; and contemporary feminism, including queer theory, intersectionality and race, and transnational and postcolonial feminism.

History Course for Rising Sophomores: Dante in His World: Politics, Poetry, Religion

Rising sophomores are especially sought for a new course on one of the greatest thinkers and writers in history, Dante Alighieri. On the 700th anniversary of his death, this course in history, medieval studies, and World Literatures in translation is open to all class years.

HIST 236: Dante in His World: Politics, Poetry, Religion
Instructor: Gary Shaw
T.R.. 02:50PM-04:10PM

Dante has been famous since his life, especially for his poem “The Divine Comedy,” including its depictions of Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven. The book reveals his massive knowledge and his deep and complex commitments to love, hope, and the good. It might be less well known that he was also an active politician and a political theorist, as well as a student of literature and style.

This course will examine the body of his work and use it to outline some of the great political, moral, and religious crises of Europe around the year 1300, many issues that continue to today, such as the importance of ethical and political commitment and courage in public life, but also the dangers of false hierarchies and one’s own ego. Readings will focus on Dante’s own writings, including “The Divine Comedy,” “The New Life” and “On Monarchy.”

Still Need a Class This Semester?

CSPL/CGST480 ENGAGED PROJECTS is a new 1-credit course in which students study a topic of their choice and produce a final project for a public audience. EPs deepen student learning and self-reflection, ease the undeniable challenges of online learning, and introduce students to their own agency and positionality in society.

Interested students should contact the instructor (Makaela Kingsley, mjkingsley@wesleyan.edu), submit a proposal on Handshake (instructions at https://www.wesleyan.edu/patricelli/engaged-projects.html), and submit an enrollment request in WesPortal.

Two New Courses

Civil Rights Litigation Since 1978: A Practitioner’s Perspective
CSPL 217        Times: Th 6:00-9PM, Location: ONLINE

This course will examine major themes in modern civil rights litigation in the United States between 1978 and 2020.  The course will review major cases challenging police misconduct, school and housing segregation, including exclusionary land use policies, sexual harassment and bullying as well as cases supporting voting and gay rights. Students will be asked to present argument before their peers regarding the issues raised in and by these cases and will also be presented with imaginary fact patterns and asked to discern the critical legal issues raised and apply both the settled law and aspirational law as we develop it through Socratic method. In addition, students will select an area of civil rights litigation and writing about its evolution.

Understanding the 2020 Presidential Election
CSPL399    Times: M.W. 1:20-2:40PM, Location: ONLINE

In understanding the 2020 Presidential Election, students will learn how to read skeptically the political press and how to write critically about presidential campaign politics. Along the way, the course will touch on electoral history, political and social thought, public policy, media criticism, and much more. Students will read past examples of thought-provoking and influential commentary. They will read current coverage in the legacy press of the 2020 presidential election and come to class prepared to discuss the most important stories and issues of the week. Students will have the opportunity to learn about electoral politics and political writing alongside a veteran journalist. Students who have experience working for political campaigns will have a chance to share their knowledge and help the class incorporate their experience in a larger historical framework. They will have a chance to see their work published in the Editorial Board, the lecturer’s daily politics newsletter. Students will attempt to do what political writers do in real-time: explain what’s happening from a unique, particular, and informed point of view for the benefit of like-minded citizens seeking to achieve the ideal of self-government. In the end, the hope is that students see that campaign politics is simpler and more complex than it appears, but that neither is obvious without study, focus, and understanding.